'Not enough cash? Just transfer it later.'

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'Not enough cash? Just transfer it later.'

That's what I was told recently in a restaurant in Germany when I checked if they took cards.

Turned out they didn't.

But it wasn't a problem for them. They didn't send me to the next ATM as has happened to me before. The owner simply said I could transfer it later. Needless to say I was perplexed.

This reminded me of an article I read a few years ago on trust in different cultures. The piece talked about high and low trust countries and the relative prosperity and happiness of people. It mentioned Denmark as a high trust country where people will often leave their pram and baby outside the cafe while they pop in for a coffee. It also made the point that the country has a very high tax rate, but no one complains because Danes trust the government to spend it wisely.

Likewise, in Norway financial transparency is vitally important for social trust levels, across all levels of society. As Norwegians pay high taxes – with an average of 40.2% compared to an EU average of just 30.1% – everyone expects and trusts the government to ensure that money is well spent. Furthermore, all Norwegians can find out how much anyone else earns and it seldom causes a problems, because the people have confidence and trust in the tax and social security system.

This contrasts strongly with many other countries where trust is continually eroded. In our Canada and Australian studies into trust in politicians, all but a few were actively distrusted, scoring around 4/10. Elsewhere, things are generally no different; for example, the election of Donald Trump and his continued success in labelling news 'fake news' is a result of people’s distrust in the established parties, politicians and media that are closely connected to them.

Many Brexit voters only voted to leave the EU because they distrusted the UK government and business elites running the country. One of our clients in London overheard people on the train the day after the referendum saying they actually didn't want an exit, but voted to “stick it up the government's .........”  

Emanuel Macron's election in France is also a result of political distrust. His is a party that achieved a clear majority with a political novice as leader and a majority of local candidates who had little if any political experience. 

Similar examples can be found on the left, the right and the new in many countries. It is a stark reminder that politicians who talk about trust, but betray it or leave it as an empty phrase, don't just run the risk of falling on their swords personally. Their failure to build trust in themselves and the institutions also impacts the way their wider communities interact with each other and ultimately prosper.

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What’s your trust made of?

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What’s your trust made of?

Many organisations fail to even ask how much they are trusted, despite trust being the most powerful driver of their performance.

But once you ask that question (and you should), the next one is ‘Why’ and 'What for'? Clearly, if you don’t know that, you can’t do anything about it.

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Trustify: it’s not rocket science – or is it?

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Trustify: it’s not rocket science – or is it?

Customers don't buy from people they don't trust – and people don’t work for organisations they don’t trust.

This aphorism is at the very core of the services and sales process. Trust is a key interlocking component that underscores everything you do as a business and without it you probably don’t have a business.

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Making great sales processes more effective

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Making great sales processes more effective

One of our clients calls his sales process “the efficiency”, and our HuTrust trust building approach “the interlocking effectiveness”.

Working with this sales director and many other clients, we have shown that this is a correct approach – often achieving more than 30% sales improvements within weeks in call centres and personal selling.

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Financial advisers and trust – an oxymoron?

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Financial advisers and trust – an oxymoron?

When I worked in advertising in Vietnam in the mid 1990s, the Vietnamese government – still hardline Communist at the time – saw advertising as a social vice. Indeed, it was number 7 on the list of vices. Ahead of gambling and prostitution and on a par with beer.

We were not high on the list of most trusted consultants.

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